Tuesday, December 3, 2013

To leaders of my nation

A person with a good general knowledge knows that Nepal is a beautiful country. A nation with a great history. The peaceful, innocent ancestors of my land sacrificed themselves at the command of their rulers for the nations neighboring them and for those who came from far away lands of the west. They set an impeccable standard of gallantry, brutality and loyalty for whom they fought. But the world does not talk about them anymore?

The world today discusses about saving it from being a failed state. The unending political melodrama, corruption, political interference by foreign forces, lawlessness has seized the country while it fights everyday to promulgate its constitution.

I used to blame politicians alone for this. But I do that no more. The civil society; we have been responsible for all that is happening in my country today. What could be the steps, Nepal as a nation should take to solve the above mentioned challenges?

We had a peaceful election and the major parties right now are fighting for their stake in the government. While they do so, I believe that as responsible citizens of the nation, we should be preparing a road map for our country. We should let our government know, what we want them to do for us.

Our leaders engage in day to day activities that are futile. They are time wasters. The whole bureaucracy is set up to assist them. Leaders instead should be engaging in dialogue with the citizens to shape our policies. 

Our leaders should then be bold enough to communicate to the world that Nepal as a sovereign nation is capable of making decisions independently. If they want to see themselves as allies of the nation, they should be partnering with the help of the bureaucratic set up that we have; partner with agencies of development through investments rather than interventions.

As a student who has been keenly interested in international affairs lately, I see the South Asian economies dependence on charity and donations as a major hurdle to their development. So is the case with my country. Nepal should stop taking donations and start re-building itself. We as citizens of a sovereign nation should feel shameful everyday  to rely on the charity. These charities are the taxes paid out of the hard earned money of citizens of those countries.

But how should we be independent? Can our government and economy sustain without such charity?

 The world today is much interdependent while we are becoming more and more dependent everyday. We should therefore be an independent nation where we as sovereign citizens carve our own life to be able to create an alliance with the interdependent economies.The facts often speak the half truth for nations like us. The statements that often come from the media and intellectual society on how important charities are is just a myth. Data and information are there to tell how much of these funds are absorbed.

Let the people play an active role in the economy. A nation as small as ours does not require multi-national companies for development. It can effectively grow with our indigenous tools and techniques. We just need to seek out for them. Our leaders should therefore be engaging in dialogue with the civil society for our own organic development and for such policy redressals.

A country's fate is determined by the kind of leaders it has than the amount of resources. Israel is a better example to illustrate this fact. I just hope, this time, our leaders stand up to our aspirations.




5 comments:

  1. the knowledge u got, is beautifully described... I'm a fan

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  2. you have dropped down your ideas so well. The most important factor for a positive change is carrying the idea to do so, and yours is revealing here. I hope the rest of young generation in your country think the same and work cohesively for a real independent state in the region. May God always be with you.

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  3. Thank you everyone for the feedback. Thank you for acknowledging my efforts Anonymous.

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